Monday, July 31, 2006

 

Musings- Alan Weiss


As many of you know, I'm a huge fan of Alan Weiss. Here are this month's musings by one of our most gifted consultants:

- If you're having trouble in networking or social situations, simply
ask the other person, "What do you think about..?" Others may be
bored by your point of view, but never by their own.

- Don't be afraid to tell someone they are doing something annoying
(such as sending irrelevant stories or newsletters). Otherwise, how
are they to know, and you're just enabling their behavior through your
silence.

- Here's a great question to separate fact from opinion: "How do you
KNOW?" Opinion is fine, but it shouldn't be confused with fact. Just
ask Dan Rather.

- There comes a point of diminishing returns for everything (there is
such a thing as too much lobster), and nothing symbolizes that better
than technology. You're a slave to your technology when its upkeep
approaches ten percent of its actual utility. (That's opinion, not fact.)

- No matter how controversial the person or the viewpoint, it's insufficient
trying to debate their views if you haven't read, first hand, their statements.
I've found relatively few people who are 100% wrong or 100% right.

- The most inane thing I'm ever asked to do in a meeting or conference is
to "give yourselves a round of applause." I find that it's silly for the audience
and represents a speaker who has simply run out of ideas and energy.

- With due respect to every low-cost, web-based alternative for air fare and
accommodations, do you really want to make decisions by least cost or, at
least occasionally, by going for best quality? (It's simple to purchase a computer
more cheaply on the web or through a catalog, but try to get help dealing with
problems, as opposed to the help you would get from a local retailer.)

- There has been an overwhelming amount of "junk science" of late about what
we eat, how to lose weight, exercise, etc. Here's something quite factual:
Moderation in eating and consistent exercise help, period.

- No one in any audience, to my knowledge, has ever complained about a
meeting ending slightly early, but they all start to lose attention once it's
sixty seconds late in ending.

- If you don't see a sunrise or a sunset weekly, no matter where you live,
you just may not be getting out enough.

- If you're having trouble in networking or social situations, simply
ask the other person, "What do you think about..?" Others may be
bored by your point of view, but never by their own.

- Don't be afraid to tell someone they are doing something annoying
(such as sending irrelevant stories or newsletters). Otherwise, how
are they to know, and you're just enabling their behavior through your
silence.

- Here's a great question to separate fact from opinion: "How do you
KNOW?" Opinion is fine, but it shouldn't be confused with fact. Just
ask Dan Rather.

- There comes a point of diminishing returns for everything (there is
such a thing as too much lobster), and nothing symbolizes that better
than technology. You're a slave to your technology when its upkeep
approaches ten percent of its actual utility. (That's opinion, not fact.)

- No matter how controversial the person or the viewpoint, it's insufficient
trying to debate their views if you haven't read, first hand, their statements.
I've found relatively few people who are 100% wrong or 100% right.

- The most inane thing I'm ever asked to do in a meeting or conference is
to "give yourselves a round of applause." I find that it's silly for the audience
and represents a speaker who has simply run out of ideas and energy.

- With due respect to every low-cost, web-based alternative for air fare and
accommodations, do you really want to make decisions by least cost or, at
least occasionally, by going for best quality? (It's simple to purchase a computer
more cheaply on the web or through a catalog, but try to get help dealing with
problems, as opposed to the help you would get from a local retailer.)

- There has been an overwhelming amount of "junk science" of late about what
we eat, how to lose weight, exercise, etc. Here's something quite factual:
Moderation in eating and consistent exercise help, period.

- No one in any audience, to my knowledge, has ever complained about a
meeting ending slightly early, but they all start to lose attention once it's
sixty seconds late in ending.

- If you don't see a sunrise or a sunset weekly, no matter where you live,
you just may not be getting out enough.

Balancing Act® is a monthly electronic newsletter
discussing the blending of life, work, and relationships,
based on the popular Balancing Act workshops and
writing of Alan Weiss, Ph.D. Contact us for further
information at:
balancingact@summitconsulting.com.

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